Architecture

Bauhaus Style, White City

by Lotte Beilin | 14.08.16
Gordon 67. 1937. Yitzhak Mandelbaum.

Gordon 67. 1937. Yitzhak Mandelbaum.

The Bauhaus Center of Tel Aviv, established in the year 2000, aims to expand Tel Aviv’s recognition as a central architectural site. The center upholds to this unique vision by creating and maintaining a program which consists of a permanent exhibition and ever-evolving changing exhibitions, tours and publications.

Between the Private and the Public Domains in Bauhaus and International Style in Tel Aviv is the Bauhaus Center’s No. 1 Bestselling Book; edited by Dr. Micha Gross and published by the Bauhaus Center in June 2016. It is the only book dealing exclusively with the state-of-the-art renovation of Bauhaus architecture in the “White City”.

Philon 8.1938

Philon 8.1938. “Licht” a German voice documenting the complicated relationship between Tel Aviv and Germany of the 1930s.

The book shows a detailed description of 34 renewal projects realized in past years by Israel’s top preservation architects: Prof. Nitza Metzger Szmuk, Prof. Amnon Bar Or, Gidi Bar Orian and many others.

Sderot Chen 4. 1939. Ben-Tsion Schilmawer and Ludwig Rauch.

Sderot Chen 4. 1939. Ben-Tsion Schilmawer and Ludwig Rauch. Shade, bench, piloti: the building says, “Don’t rush, sit for a minute,” characteristic features of these buildings.

Photographers Michael Craig Palmer and Ingrid Botschen’s  objective was to photograph the transition of spaces in Bauhaus buildings in Tel Aviv; the transition from a public area in the street to a private area in someone’s apartment–how it feels to move inside the building, how it feels to leave your private space and then enter the public space. It’s a very special experience for the people living in these buildings. 

Hovevei Tzion 51. 1937. Salomon Gepstein

Hovevei Tzion 51. 1937. Salomon Gepstein, Shade, bench and fish pond: characteristic of public-to-private spaces/outside-to-inside mood transition spaces in Tel Aviv Bauhaus Buildings.

Yael 3. 1935. Oskar Kaufmann. A startlingly minimalist detail in a startlingly minimalist building demonstrates the great imagination and craft visible in many White City structures.

Yael 3. 1935. Oskar Kaufmann. A startlingly minimalist detail in a startlingly minimalist building demonstrates the great imagination and craft visible in many White City structures.

Currently, photographers Michael Craig Palmer and Ingrid Botschen are starting up another project that intersects with Tel Aviv history. This is a photo project about Erich Mendelsohn, the German emigre architect of the Tel Aviv Bahuaus era. In Israel, Mendelsohn designed the Weitzman House in Rehovot, the Rambam Hospital in Haifa and the Hadassa hospital in Jerusalem, to name a few.

His work has become quite neglected in the past few decades, although it is still extremely visual. No photographer has tried to do a comprehensive view of his works today, so this is something Michael and Ingrid along with The Bauhaus Center are taking on. It will take about 3 years and they hope to be able to tell the story of Mendelsohn as a German and a Jew, as someone who lived in Europe and in the U.S.

Bauhaus Center, Dizengoff St. 77, Tel Aviv, (+972)3-522-0249, info@bauhaus-center.com.
www.bauhaus-center.com | Facebook | Instagram: @bauhauscenter

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